Are you ready for a Wild Goose Chase?

Starting line of previous year Wild Goose
Chase 5K.

The fourth annual Wild Goose Chase 5K trail run/walk will be held on September 14, 2019 at 10:00 am at Rogers Center. Registration is open here. You can also print the form on page 10 of this newsletter and mail it in with your payment.

New for 2019, we have partnered with Gazelle Race Timing for scoring and timing of all participants along with a live results television monitor and kiosk.

Age groups are Girls & Boys age 10-15 and Men & Women age 16+. Prizes will be awarded to the top 3 racers in each category. Strollers and dogs are not permitted for the race.

Those who pre-register for the “Wild Goose Chase” by August 28 will save $5 and are guaranteed a free t-shirt.(Please note that after September 11, potential participants will need to wait until September 14 for “Day Of” registration at the event site along with an increase to $35 adult & Are you ready for a Wild Goose Chase? $30 10-15. For more information, please see the flyer on page 9 of this newsletter. Sign up early to make sure you and your friends get a spot on this fun run through the trails and grounds of Rogers Center!

Meet Rogers Center Summer Adventure Camp Counselors

Pictured above: back row – Jeff Lyons, SUNY Potsdam 2011; Peter J Gauhgan, Utica Collge; Friends of Rogers Executive Director, Simon Solomon; Jeremy Fetzleo, SUNY Cobelskill; Sierra Gold, SUNY Oneonta. Middle row – Elizabeth Vera, SUNY Cobleskill; Katie McLaughlin, SUNY Meet Rogers Center Summer Adventure Camp Counselors ESF 2018; Haley Korcz, University of Washington; Jordon Sanford, Mansfield University; Friends of Rogers Senior Educator, Marissa Nolan. Seated in front – Kyle Crawford, SUNY ESF. Not in photo – Rebecca Lyons, Clarks Summit University 2012.

The Rogers Center Summer Adventure Camp for kids ages 3-15 is starting soon! The 6-8 group is full, but there are some spots available for the 3-5, 9-11 and 12-15 ages. Please call asap if you are planning on Adventure Camp for your child this summer. If you are interested, these forms are on the website here.

As camp is starting July 1st, the 2019 staff has been at Rogers Center preparing to give your kids the best camp experience they can have this summer. The counselors are college students, or recent grads, working for Friends of Rogers for the Summer Adventure Camp program. Many are returning to us from previous years!

Ask Friends of Rogers

Bittersweet nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) is now a common sight along roads and trails in North America. It has distinctive purple and yellow flowers but its fruit looks like miniature tomatoes.

Dear Friends of Rogers,

I just found out tomatoes and belladonna are both in the nightshade family. I know belladonna is very poisonous, is it dangerous to eat tomatoes?

Sincerely,
Worried about Nightshades

 

Dear Worried,

Plant families do share characteristics, but you can relax and enjoy your tomatoes! The nightshade family, Solanaceae, also includes eggplant, potatoes, and bell peppers. There are plenty of instances of food we love having some deadly cousins, but do not let that scare you away from vegetables. Toxins in plants can be very localized and the dose makes the poison. For example, tomatoes and potatoes are great, but eating their leaves can make you sick. However, you would have to eat a lot of leaves for it to be serious.

You are not the only one to be wary of this connection. When Europeans first came to the Americas, they were appalled to see natives eating tomatoes. The fruit looked so similar to deadly bittersweet nightshade berries they assumed it was the same plant. Supposedly, throwing tomatoes at bad stage performers to show dislike has its roots in this confusion. Bittersweet nightshade has since been brought over to North America and you can find it on our trails!

Throughout the centuries, humans have mistaken poisonous plants and their harmless lookalikes. Westward settlers on the Oregon Trail had to be careful they did not gather poison hemlock instead of parsnips. People today still confuse edible sumac with poison sumac which causes a rash like poison ivy.

Toxins in plants are not always bad. Some have led to medical breakthroughs. Nightshade plants have been used as anesthetics and pain relievers. A compound in yew, a common garden shrub, is being investigated as a cancer medication. All parts of the yew plant are poisonous and can cause death in a few hours.

Hope this clears up your confusion.

Sincerely,

Friends of Rogers

 

P.S. If you want to discover what other deadly plants are lurking in your backyard come to “Everyday Poisons” our July Learning Lecture. It will be Tuesday, July 2nd at 6:30 pm at Rogers Center find more information from the flyer in this newsletter.

The Value of a Healthy Environment

Oh my, it’s already July!! Is it really summer? With such unseasonably autumn-like air and spring rain, one really needs to stay on track with the calendar to know which month of the year it is! While I was writing this month’s newsletter, I felt intrigued to do some research of my own regarding past weather trends. Historic logs have shown that our average temperature and quantity of precipitation has substantially increased; spikes in temperature became much more prevalent after about 1985 and the number of spikes of precipitation has followed ever since 1995. The weather graphs really look no different than the trends of the stock market; however, an above normal increase in the stock indexes is much better received than an above normal increase in the temperature/ precipitation indexes. Of course, the yearly trends of warm/cool, dry/wet always eb and flow, yet historically speaking, the trends show an increase across the board.

What can we do to be cognizant of our environment? We can continue to educate our children, our future stewards of the land! Whether it be by enrolling your child and or family member in one of our Rogers Center Summer Adventure Camps July 1st – August 23rd, or by simply visiting property and doing a walk and talk with your family about the importance of preserving a healthy environment. Make it double the pleasure while hiking the trails or eating a picnic lunch at one of the many picnic tables peppered about on property.

Right now our summer staff is gearing up for camp, and all twelve camp counselors will ensure your child or family member becomes entrenched in “the Rogers Way” while hopefully not getting drenched while out on the trails this summer! Regardless, Rogers is rip roaring ready to go with the trails open and accessible for you to experience YOUR very own nature day.

Have a safe and Happy Independence Day!!! See you on the trails,

FOR Color Palette

Primary color:
#33AD7C
#33AD7C
#0EA86A
#0EA86A
#008952
#008952
#007043
#007043
#005332
#005332
Secondary color (1):
#3873A4
#3873A4
#17629F
#17629F
#094B82
#094B82
#063D6A
#063D6A
#032C4F
#032C4F
Secondary color (2):
#FEB34B
#FEB34B
#F79814
#F79814
#C97500
#C97500
#A55F00
#A55F00
#7B4700
#7B4700
Complement color:
#FE804B
#FE804B
#F75814
#F75814
#C93C00
#C93C00
#A53100
#A53100
#7B2500
#7B2500

Color Palette by Paletton.com

Palette URL: http://paletton.com/#uid=70p0u0khW9qaKisbIaPmw7hrV4H

Primary color:
#937662
#937662
#564337
#564337
#4B3221
#4B3221
#3A2211
#3A2211
#251205
#251205
Secondary color (1):
#938162
#938162
#564B37
#564B37
#4B3C21
#4B3C21
#3A2B11
#3A2B11
#251905
#251905
Secondary color (2):
#444F61
#444F61
#262D39
#262D39
#182232
#182232
#0E1726
#0E1726
#050D19
#050D19
Complement color:
#3E5D58
#3E5D58
#233733
#233733
#15302B
#15302B
#0B2520
#0B2520
#031814
#031814